Honey Bee Viruses, the Deadly Varroa Mite Associates

Adult bees with deformed wings resulting from DWV. If your bees have Varroa, your bees have viruses. 

Authors: Philip A. Moore, Michael E. Wilson, and John A. Skinner
Department of Entomology and Plant Pathology, the University of Tennessee, Knoxville TN
Originally Published: August 21, 2014

Introduction

Varroa mites (Varroa spp.) are a ubiquitous parasite of honey bee (Apis spp.) colonies. They are common nearly everywhere honey bees are found, and every beekeeper should assume they have a Varroa infestation, if they are in a …

Varroa Mite Reproductive Biology

Image:CAPfeature.jpgLearn about some of the latest research into bee decline.
Managed Pollinator Coordinated Agriculture Program (CAP) Updates

A National Research and Extension Initiative to Reverse Pollinator Decline

This is part of an ongoing series of updates from the Managed Pollinator CAP. Additional installments can be found at the:

CAP Updates Table of Contents

More information about the CAP can be found at:

http://www.beeccdcap.uga.edu

 
 

by Zachary Huang, Department of Entomology, Michigan State University, E. Lansing, MI 48824

CAP Updates: 29

  • Jointly

Lessons Learned by the Managed Pollinator CAP: Impacts of Varroa Parasitism on Honey Bee Health

Image:CAPfeature.jpgLearn about some of the latest research into bee decline.
Managed Pollinator Coordinated Agriculture Program (CAP) Updates

A National Research and Extension Initiative to Reverse Pollinator Decline

This is part of an ongoing series of updates from the Managed Pollinator CAP. Additional installments can be found at the:

CAP Updates Table of Contents

More information about the CAP can be found at:

http://www.beeccdcap.uga.edu

 
 

by Katherine Aronstein1 and Angela Douglas2

CAP Updates: 27

ABRC2011 The Good the Bad and the Ugly Varroa Mite Control Strategy

Ingemar Fries presents: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly Varroa mite control strategy. Ingemar Fries, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden Proceedings of the American Bee Research Conference 2011

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Related Links

How bees bred

Methods for Varroa Sampling

Sampling for Varroa

Why SAMPLE in a standard way?

  • Be informed: know thy enemy!
  • Decrease use of miticides!
  • Reduce chemical residues in hive!
  • Save time and money!
  • Develop regional treatment thresholds!
  • Breed queens from colonies with low mites!


1. Sampling a Colony: Sample 300 adult
bees from one frame containing brood
(eggs, larvae or pupae).



2. 300 bees occupy a volume of 0.42 cup or
100 ml. Be careful! Bees are small, so
small changes in volume leads to large…

Varroa Sampling

The ‘Gizmo’ is a device developed at the University of Minnesota to aid in the collection of 300 adult honey bees for varroa mite sampling.

Sampling honey bee colonies for Varroa destructor is an extremely important tool for gaining control of Varroa mites.

Why SAMPLE in a standard way?

  • Be informed: know thy enemy!
  • Decrease use of miticides!
  • Reduce chemical residues in hive!
  • Save time and money!
  • Develop regional treatment thresholds!
  • Breed queens from colonies with low mites!

The following …

ABRC2010 A Test for Sub-acute Effects of Some Commonly Used Bee Hive Chemicals

The following was presented at the 2010 American Bee Research Conference in Orlando, FL.

6. Delaplane, K.S. & J.A. Berry – A TEST FOR SUB-LETHAL EFFECTS OF SOME COMMONLY USED HIVE CHEMICALS, YEAR TWO – We are involved in a two-year, two-state (GA, SC) experiment examining sub-lethal effects of selected bee hive chemicals; the list includes registered products at label rates as well as two off-label formulations. The reason we are doing this is that there is evidence that some …

ABRC2010 A New Assay to Measure Mite Grooming Behavior

The following was presented at the 2010 American Bee Research Conference in Orlando, FL.

3. Andinof, G.K. & G.J. Hunt – A NEW ASSAY TO MEASURE MITE GROOMING BEHAVIOR – Grooming behavior is one of the known mechanisms of defense for honey bees against parasitic mites. Varroa destructor is often considered the biggest beekeeping problem within the U.S. and around the world. Mite-grooming behavior has been described as the ability of the adult bees to remove Varroa mites during grooming …

ABRC2010 Drug Interactions Between In-hive Miticides and Fungicides in Honey Bees

The following was presented at the 2010 American Bee Research Conference in Orlando, FL.

17. Johnsonc, R., L. Petersc, B. Siegfriedd & M.D. Ellisc – DRUG INTERACTIONS BETWEEN IN-HIVE MITICIDES AND FUNGICIDES IN HONEY BEES – Beekeepers must often resort to using varroacides to reduce parasitic varroa mite populations in honey bee colonies. The utility of varroacides depends on honey bee tolerance of these pesticides at dosages that kill varroa mites. Honey bee tolerance of three commonly used varroacides – …

ABRC2010 Effects of Varroa Mites and Bee Diseases on Pollination Efficacy of Honey Bees

The following was presented at the 2010 American Bee Research Conference in Orlando, FL.

1. Afik, O., W.B. Hunter & K.S. Delaplane – EFFECTS OF VARROA MITES AND BEE DISEASES ON POLLINATION EFFICACY OF HONEY BEES – Varroa mites and viral diseases are known to affect the efficiency of crop pollination by honey bees through the elimination of colonies, but only limited information exists on their influence on pollination at sub-lethal levels on the individual bee (Ellis & Delaplane, 2008 …