Which pesticide formulations are least hazardous to honey bees?

Different formulations of the same insecticide often vary considerably in their toxicity to bees. Granular insecticides generally are not hazardous to honey bees. Dust formulations (seldom used today on commercial field crops) are typically more hazardous than emulsifiable concentrates because they adhere to the bee’s body hairs and are carried back to the beehive. Wettable powder and flowable formulations essentially dry to a dust-like form which foragers can carry to the hives. Likewise, microencapsulated insecticides can be collected by foragers …

Neonicotinoid Seed Treatments and Honey Bee Health

Image:CAPfeature.jpgLearn about some of the latest research into bee decline.
Managed Pollinator Coordinated Agriculture Program (CAP) Updates

A National Research and Extension Initiative to Reverse Pollinator Decline

This is part of an ongoing series of updates from the Managed Pollinator CAP. Additional installments can be found at the:

CAP Updates Table of Contents

More information about the CAP can be found at:

http://www.beeccdcap.uga.edu

 
 

by Greg Hunt and Christian Krupke, Purdue University

CAP Updates: 28

The First Two Years of the Stationary Hive Project: Abiotic Site Effects

Managed Pollinator Coordinated Agriculture Program (CAP) Updates

A National Research and Extension Initiative to Reverse Pollinator Decline

This is part of an ongoing series of updates from the Managed Pollinator CAP. Additional installments can be found at the:

CAP Updates Table of Contents

More information about the CAP can be found at:

http://www.beeccdcap.uga.edu

 


by Francis Drummond1; Kate Aronstein2; Judy Chen4; James Ellis3; Jay Evans4; Nancy Ostiguy5; Walter Sheppard

Protecting Honey Bees During Corn and Soybean Planting Season

Field crops planting season is underway in the Midwest. Most of the annual crop acreage planted in North America this year will use neonicotinoid treated seed. Neonicotinoids are extremely toxic to honey bees, and recent research has suggested that honey bees that forage near these types of plantings may be at risk. The risk is greatest during the period while crops are being planted. Dr. Christian Krupke and Dr. Greg Hunt (Purdue Extension Entomology) will present an overview of the …

The Managed Pollinator CAP after Three Years: Highlights and Emerging Trends

Managed Pollinator Coordinated Agriculture Program (CAP) Updates

A National Research and Extension Initiative to Reverse Pollinator Decline

This is part of an ongoing series of updates from the Managed Pollinator CAP. Additional installments can be found at the:

CAP Updates Table of Contents

More information about the CAP can be found at:

http://www.beeccdcap.uga.edu

 


Keith S. Delaplane, Professor and CAP Director, University of Georgia

by Keith S. Delaplane, Professor and CAP Director, University of Georgia

CAP Updates: 23

  • Jointly published in

Nest Location in Bumble Bees: Effect of Landscapes and Insecticides

Managed Pollinator Coordinated Agriculture Program (CAP) Updates

A National Research and Extension Initiative to Reverse Pollinator Decline

This is part of an ongoing series of updates from the Managed Pollinator CAP. Additional installments can be found at the:

CAP Updates Table of Contents

More information about the CAP can be found at:

http://www.beeccdcap.uga.edu

 


Anne L. Averill, University of Massachusetts/Amherst

by Anne L. Averill, University of Massachusetts/Amherst

CAP Updates: 22

Jointly published in the American Bee Journal and in Bee Culture

Broodmapper: Honey Bee Development and Citizen Science

Help identify brood stages and hone your skills in inspecting honey bee colonies.

Figure 1: A honey bee emerging from a capped cell. Above, left of the emerging bee is a capped cell with a developing pupa unseen, underneath the cap. Above, far right of the emerging bee is a cell with a honey bee egg.

Figure 2: A screenshot from Broodmapper.com with scored cells.

Honey bee development

Honey bees develop from eggs to adults in the cells of honey …

Miticide and Fungicide Interactions

Managed Pollinator Coordinated Agriculture Program (CAP) Updates

A National Research and Extension Initiative to Reverse Pollinator Decline

This is part of an ongoing series of updates from the Managed Pollinator CAP. Additional installments can be found at the:

CAP Updates Table of Contents

More information about the CAP can be found at:

http://www.beeccdcap.uga.edu


CAP Updates: 20

by Reed M. Johnson, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Jointly published in the American Bee Journal and in Bee Culture, October 2011.

There is no …

Assessing the Risks of Honey Bee Exposure to Pesticides

Managed Pollinator Coordinated Agriculture Program (CAP) Updates

A National Research and Extension Initiative to Reverse Pollinator Decline

This is part of an ongoing series of updates from the Managed Pollinator CAP. Additional installments can be found at the:

CAP Updates Table of Contents

More information about the CAP can be found at:

http://www.beeccdcap.uga.edu


CAP Updates: 17

Marion Ellis and Bethany Teeters, University of Nebraska

Abiotic stress …

Pesticides and Their Involvement in Colony Collapse Disorder

Managed Pollinator Coordinated Agriculture Program (CAP) Updates

A National Research and Extension Initiative to Reverse Pollinator Decline

This is part of an ongoing series of updates from the Managed Pollinator CAP. Additional installments can be found at the:

CAP Updates Table of Contents

More information about the CAP can be found at:

http://www.beeccdcap.uga.edu


CAP Updates: 18

by JIM FRAZIER, CHRIS MULLIN, MARYANN FRAZIER and SARA ASHCRAFT Department of Entomology; Penn State University, 501 ASI Building, University Park, PA

Jointly published …